Crucifying Morality

Crucifying MoralityThe beatitudes have been worked over, dissected, evaluated and interpreted from every human and denominational angle possible. There are metaphysical and allegorical viewpoints that would make you think you have fallen into a philosophical time warp. Yet very few seem to hit the “where the rubber meets the road” interpretation. Along comes R.W. Glenn with a fresh look at how the beatitudes are applicable for 21st century Christians. (And we can define Christians as anyone who reads the Bible with the intent of improving his life)

R W Glenn is the Pastor of Preaching & Vision at Redeemer Bible Church in Minnetonka, MN. He is in the group of hip, young preachers that seem to gravitate toward mega churches. That is not meant derogatorily but rather as what-to-expect information. These are the guys that can enlighten the young generation.

Glenn’s newest work, Crucifying Morality, is a fresh, insightful consideration of the Beatitudes found in Matthew 5.1-12. Crucifying Morality is a walk through the beatitudes in modern language. It is fresh and highly applicable for the Believer’s everyday life. It is written in a verse-by-verse format making it easy to follow.

Glenn’s overarching interpretive principle is that the beatitudes are not commands, but rather Christian principle, sort of a code of conduct for the believer.

If one is ever intending to preach or teach on the beatitudes, this will serve as an excellent resource. Glenn provides thoughtful insight as well as some applicable illustrations.

As a study, growth and application aid, there are questions upon which the reader can reflect at the end of each chapter

There is no reason to prolong the evaluation of this book. For Christians and non-Christians who have ever wondered what in the world Jesus was talking about as he began the sermon on the mount, get this, read it, digest it and apply it. Your life will be better for the effort.

Note 1:I was provided this book by Cross Focus Reviews in exchange for my honest review.

Note 2: This review was originally posted on April 4, 2013 on the blog Eye On Christianity.

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