NKJV Unapologetic Study Bible

Before the year closes, one more review – naturally concerning another Study Bible. This is the NKJV Unapologetic Study Bible published by Thomas Nelson with material supplied by Kairos Journal.NKJV Unapologetic Study Bible

According to their website Kairos Journal “seeks to embolden, educate, equip, and support pastors and church leaders as they strive to transform the moral conscience of the culture and restore the prophetic voice of the Church.” Their doctrinal statement is orthodox and conservative, however, I would have preferred the word “inerrant” also be included in part c. concerning the Bible. In short, Kairos Journal is a parachurch ministry.

The overall structure of this Study Bible is traditional. Each book of the Bible has introductory information – Introduction, Background, Content, Insight and Outline. Unique to this volume are eight topical categories – Church, Corruption, Economics, Education, Family, Government, Sanctity of Life and Virtue. It is around these eight categories that the “study” portion of this Bible is based. Throughout the text there are articles attending to the categories as appropriate.

For instance, as one begins Genesis, there is an article under the category of Education with the subtitle “Evolution and Intelligent Design.” This is immediately followed by an article on Family: Homosexuality and Transgenderism and then an article on Government: Environmentalism. For sure, the Unapologetic Study Bible makes no apologies for tackling the difficult and controversial subjects.

I found the Unapologetic Study Bible to be a cultural gem. Its unique approach makes it an excellent reference volume whether or not one agrees with the point of view. If one thinks the Bible is a dusty, musty piece of literature from ages past with no relevance for today, this Study Bible will get you thinking. True to their goal, Kairos Journal has produced a Bible that should be on the shelf of every pastor and teacher. Finally, I would highly recommend the Unapologetic Study Bible to anyone who believes or doubts that the Bible is relevant to the twenty-first century culture.

Disclaimer: I was provided a copy of this volume by Thomas Nelson for a fair and honest revie

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The Spurgeon Study Bible

It can be safely assumed that 99.44% of the people reading this review know the reputation of Charles Haddon Spurgeon. One could well argue that he was the most prolific preacher and writer in the history of the Christian faith. So it was inevitable that eventually a publisher would produce a “Spurgeon Study Bible.”The Spurgeon Study Bible

Voila! Holman Bible Publishers has taken that step. And it is a classy production! In a publishing world awash in “Study Bibles” (We have another “Study Bible” waiting in line for our next review), this one is a unmistakable standout. And to add to its exclusivity, Alistair Begg was employed as the editor. Begg is the Senior Pastor of Parkside Church not far from Cleveland, OH and the progenitor of Truth For Life.

The Spurgeon Study Bible is done in the newly minted (2017) Christian Standard Bible (CSB) also published by Holman. Format wise it is virtually identical to other Study Bibles – book introductions (which include a section concerning Spurgeon’s thoughts on the book), maps, concordance, and notes at the bottom of the pages. But it is this last which makes this so special. All of the notes are from Spurgeon’s writings making it a goldmine of reference material. If you want to know what Spurgeon though about Genesis 1 and 2, go there and the notes are before you. And, of course, excerpts from the “Treasury of David” are waiting for you in the Psalms.

Other features include a brief biography of Spurgeon written by Begg and twenty of The Lost Sermons of C.H. Spurgeon (ten from the OT and ten from the NT). These are well presented with Spurgeon’s original handwriting and a clean transcription appearing on facing pages. Preachers will find it interesting how Spurgeon’s mind worked.

Also included is an introduction to the CSB providing the translation philosophy for the CSB. It’s worth the read.

This is a Study Bible for all believers. Everyone will be blessed and enriched by this volume. If you love the writings of Spurgeon, this is a must for your desk. My copy is sitting within an arm’s reach.

Disclaimer: This Bible was provided to me by Holman Bible Publishers for a fair and honest review.

NIV Reader’s Bible

In today’s world of Bible printing and translation, there is a copy of Scripture for everyone and every need. Quite honestly, if you cannot find a Bible that matches your reading level and style and that suits your desired study interest, you would be better served to learn Hebrew and Greek and return to the original languages. However, into this world now enters a Bible that fills a void – just plain ol’ reading the Scriptures. What a concept!NIV Reader's Bible

The NIV Reader’s Bible  adds to that collection but it is like water in the desert. It is exactly what the title claims. In fact it promotes itself as being “Designed for a seamless reading experience.” It is precisely that. It has been created just to be read. There are no chapter and verse references within the text. Book, chapter and verse designations are given at the top of each page – and that’s it. The lone exception is the book of Psalms in which each Psalm is numbered but there are no verse references. The only reading assistance given in the entire Bible is in the form of paragraphs throughout the text. Textual and translation footnotes have been converted into endnotes and placed at the end of each book which also aids in the reading experience.

The text itself, of course, is the highly readable NIV which, since it is a dynamic equivalent translation, lends itself perfectly to this format. It is smooth reading without distractions to the eye – even in good sized print – 10.5 point type size.

Here’s the summation of the matter: This Bible is perfect for a Scripture Reading Plan, whichever one you may select – absolutely perfect. Nothing within the text will divert the eye of the reader. You won’t be able to do in-depth study with this Bible, but that was not the intention of Zondervan, the publisher. Zondervan wants us to Just Read It.

And, as you might imagine, from a marketing standpoint, the timing on this release is also strategic, just in time for the gift-giving season. So, if there is someone on your list who needs to just READ the Bible, this is the ideal gift.

This Bible is a must if you just want to sit down and read Scripture.

Disclaimer: The Bible was provided to me by Zondervan for a fair and honest review.

The Gift of Heaven

Have you noticed all the books about heaven lately? To include the good, the bad and the ugly. Seems every well-known preacher or teacher with a computer, or typewriter or yellow legal pad has been producing one.The Gift of Heaven

Well, here’s another – The Gift of Heaven by Charles F. Stanley. (Next month we’ll review one by Robert Jeffress with his entry into the fray.) Stanley is the long time senior pastor of First Baptist Church of Atlanta, Georgia and is well-known for his preaching and teaching ministry. The book is published by Harper Collins Publishing.

The book is beautifully done with lots of serene pictures surely intended to give the reader a “sense” of heaven. Structurally it has a study hard cover and thick glossy pages all 160 of them. Unfortunately, the contents are arranged in such a manner that almost half of the pages are taken up with short quotations on facing pages. And in many cases of actual text only half of the page is filled leaving room for the tranquil pictures. Thus, it makes for a quick and easy read.

Stanley tackles the subject of Heaven in very perfunctory manner. At times it has the feel of sermon notes put into prose. Therefore, this volume is definitely not for in-depth study. Actually it only touches the surface on the subject.

The most redeeming quality is that it would serve as an excellent gift for new believers who desire hope and assurance of their future destination. Or perhaps it would be useful as an evangelistic tool. It’s the type of book to leave on the coffee table which, in the presence of visitors, might stir up a conversation.

Bottom line recommendation: Buy it as a gift, not as a study tool.

Disclaimer: This book was provided to me by Harper Collins Publishing for a fair and honest review.

NIV Faithlife Study Bible

In a Christian publishing world that is awash in “Study” Bibles, it is a herculean task to publish one that is a standout. There are topical, themed, theological, chronological, popular-pastor … well, you get the idea … study Bibles. So when the NIV Faithlife Study Bible came my way, I was quite curious. I have known of Faithlife (formerly Logos) for several years as a user of their software. Faithlife has been stirring up the digital Bible world for twenty-five years. Logos Bible Software is their flagship product. With the success of their Bible software, they have expanded significantly, almost all within the Bible scholarship arena. For a number of years they have been “working on” the Faithlife Study Bible as a digital product, adding and editing as time progressed. In fact, you can get virtually all of the information in NIV Faithlife Study Bible at  https://faithlifebible.com/. The major difference will be the Bible translation – you’ll get the Lexham English Bible on line.NIV Faithlife Study Bible

Now you can get that digital project in print. Faithlife has teamed with Zondervan to publish the  NIV Faithlife Study Bible. The combination makes for a dynamic Bible study tool. Faithlife has used their wide range of digital resources to produce a Bible that is more than just another “Study” Bible. At first glance it may look like a typical study Bible, But do not be deceived; it is the visual content of this publication that makes it so beneficial.

What makes this “Study” Bible so special is the multitude of charts, graphs, tables, lists, timelines, etc., that are appropriately placed with the biblical text. For example, at the start of every book there is a timeline pertaining to that book or collection of books (such as Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther). This is a tremendous aid to the understanding of the historical context.

Of course, with all of these study aids and extra “goodies” comes a bit of bulk. There are 2304 pages included in the two inch thick volume and it weighs in at 3.8 pounds – perhaps a bit heavy to be toting everywhere you go. But, putting aside the bulk, this Bible is well worth the investment.

If you are a “I want to feel the Bible in my hand to read it” person, this is the version of the Faithlife Study Bible to have. In fact, this may be THE “Study Bible” to have.

Disclaimer: I was provided this volume by Zondervan for a fair and honest review.

The Essence of the New Testament

In a world that is awash in volumes concerning New Testament Surveys and Introductions, we have a new entry (well, it’s a second edition entry) – The Essence of the New Testament: A Survey. It was published by B&H Academic. It is outstanding!the-essence-of-the-nt

So with such a multitude of surveys, what would make this standout from all the others?

The editors and contributors. This volume is edited by Elmer Towns and Ben Gutierrez. Towns, of course, is a well-known figure in evangelical circles and a prolific writer (over 170 books plus countless articles) and a co-founder of Liberty University. Gutierrez is a Ph.D. and professor at Liberty. The seven contributors (along with Towns and Gutierrez) are all conservative scholars and professors.

The quality and conciseness. One of the trends in New Testament survey books is an overabundance of information that might be more suited for advanced study. But not with The Essence of the New Testament. The authors have obviously made a determined effort to filter the extraneous and present vital and essential information without trying to weigh down the reader.

The book opens with four chapters on introductory material leading with “How We Got the New Testament.” Each entry on the twenty-seven books of the NT contains the standard biblical background information – author, recipients, occasion and date, and outline. This is followed by a brief commentary entitled the “Message” that follows the structure of the outline adding to the smooth flow of the book and ease of understanding.

The end of each book has study questions and a brief bibliography and there are also a multitude of pictures and a number of charts that further facilitate the explanation of the particular NT book.

The viability for Christians. One of the most attractive qualities of this book is that it will have appeal to a majority of believers. It is straightforward and easy to follow – no linguistic tricks and no ivory tower theological language. It is a reference volume that the inquisitive Bible student will want to have at the ready when studying any book of the New Testament. (I have a vison of someone studying Colossians with the Bible in front, a notepad to one side and The Essence of the New Testament on the other.)

This is a must-have volume for every Christian especially teachers and preachers. It is a double must-have volume for new believers and first year Bible college students. It is a classic Bible educational tool. This volume will pique the student’s curiosity for more information.

Disclaimer: This volume was provided to me by B&H Academic for a fair and honest review.

Greek for Everyone

One of the pressing questions for all those who “religiously” study the Bible is what about the original languages? A plethora of questions arise from this starting point: Do I really need to know the original languages? If so, how much? How do I go about learning these languages?greek-for-everyone

Naturally, there is no shortage of Greek language experts and with that, of course, a plethora of books on how to learn Greek. I have in my library at least half a dozen books featuring the subject of learning Greek – Greek for the Rest of Us, Learn NT Greek, You Can Learn NT Greek are just three of the titles. All of these present us with basically the same format – learn vocabulary, the declensions and their endings, the conjugation of all the verbs and so on.

Now I have a new one – Greek for Everyone: Introductory Greek for Bible Study and Application by A. Chadwick Thornhill. Thornhill holds a PhD and is a professor at Liberty University. The book is published by BakerBooks.

So it was with a here-we-go-again attitude that I began to dig into Thornhill’s volume. But what a surprise! Thornhill does not demand a routine of endless memorization. Yes, he encourages us to get a grasp on some basic vocabulary, however, his emphasis is not on producing Greek scholars but rather on making us functional in the Greek language so we can dig a little deeper into the Scriptures. He does this through a survey of “the most important parts of speech and grammatical features of the Greek of the New Testament.” (He spends nine chapters on this information.) His theory is that if we are familiar with these basic elements of Greek, we can then use various “Resources for Navigating the Greek New Testament,” which are explained in Chapter 4.

If you have a desire to be able to investigate the New Testament in the original Greek, but have minimal time to spend studying the myriad of complexities of the language, Greek for Everyone is a book you will find indispensable. If you have an aspiration to learn the language, I would recommend you begin with this volume. Then you can study the more detailed Greek textbooks.

Disclaimer: This book was provided to me by BakerBooks for a fair, honest and impartial review.